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Upcoming Health Conference: Brain Science and Health Fitness Topics by Michael Gonzalez-Wallace

August 2, 2010

brain fitness

Brain Fitness Health Topics

Hi there “Super Body, Super Brain” followers. I am so excited with my upcoming conference. Over 200 people will be attending this great Conference where I will exposing my program and discuss the following topics:

-Brain Fitness and  Movement

-The Treasure of the brain lies at its bottom: The Cerebellum

-Latest Studies in Neuroscience, Exercise Science and Nutrition

-NEUROSCIENCE APPLIED TO FITNESS
The More we use our brain the better physical and mental results
The more active we are the greater connectivity between brain regions

-Strength training benefits

-Brain, Strength Training and Movement

Conclusion

VIDEO MEDICAL ANIMATION

VIDEO ENGLEWOOD HOSPITAL

UPCOMING BOOK

Extras

Complex Movement Uses more brain areas
Nutrition vs Intelligence

13 Comments leave one →
  1. August 2, 2010 10:00 pm

    Alright so someone is going to video this & you’ll post a clip on fb, wordpress & your website RIGHT? =)

    • August 2, 2010 11:43 pm

      hahahhaha I don’t know Rebecca…not sure about that…..at least I wanted to share my plans for the conference with all of you since you are part of my extended family!
      thanks for commenting!

  2. Aseda permalink
    August 3, 2010 2:02 pm

    Mr. Gonzalez, first of all congratulations on this conference and I hope the audience will be educated as much as the brain does, performing your exercises. You should talk more about this in colleges and universities since I believe students will benefit a lot from it.

    My question is always about the science behind it. I have not seen the slides of your presentation so, how do you know for sure that these exercises emphasize more on the cerebellum rather than other areas of the brain????

    I know that cerebelleum is responsible for motor control and coordination and to support this are the research subjects the only one to prove so?

    Second, this area of the brain is very important for other functions as well, as you may know, so is there any evidence that in the case of damage or degeneration people will experince disorders in motor learning, posture and so on.
    Have you extended your studies to a group of people that have such disorders due to cerebellum damage?

    And my final one: Is there any research extended to Purkinje cells and neuronal plasticity done in conjuction with the exercises?? Prove of it should be quite remarkable.

    Looking forward to hearing from you!!

    • August 7, 2010 12:55 am

      Mr. Gonzalez, first of all congratulations on this conference and I hope the audience will be educated as much as the brain does, performing your exercises. You should talk more about this in colleges and universities since I believe students will benefit a lot from it.

      My question is always about the science behind it. I have not seen the slides of your presentation so, how do you know for sure that these exercises emphasize more on the cerebellum rather than other areas of the brain????

      Dear Aseda,

      Thanks so much for your inquisitive and always challenging questions. Yes the Cerebellum it is an authentic hidden treasure in our brains. The Cerebellum, like you mention it is responsible for balance, coordination and many other functions such as posture alignment, muscle timing, problem solving speech and others. However one of the functions that have been studied the most and not mentioned yet is that The Cerebellum receives all the sensory propriocetive feedback from our muscles, tendons, ligaments and so on.

      When asked Dr JM from Columbia University

      You mention that the Cerebellum is a “motor control structure” what does it mean?
      It helps to control our movements. Let me give you an example. Our cardiovascular system includes our heart and all of our arteries and veins. Damage to the heart, a pump, affects the system on a whole. It doesn’t work well, even if our arteries are working just fine. The motor system has many components, located in many different parts of the brain and spinal cord. One component is the cerebellum. It is important in coordination, among other things.

      CEREBELLUM STRUCTURE
      The Cerebellum has three different parts. Why are these parts so important?
      Each part contributes something different to the overall function of the cerebellum and the motor system. One for posture and balance, one for coordinating movements of our arms and legs, and a third for helping us to plan our movements.

      How different are Purkinje cells in the Cerebellum from the “traditional” neurons in the rest of the brain?
      I think they are different in several ways. Let me tell you about two. First, they take in an enormous amount of information. Think of a big tree with lots of branches and leaves. This is like a Purkinje cell; the branches and leaves are receiving information from other parts of the nervous system. They have more “branches and leaves” than other nerve cells. Second, they are different in another way; they inhibit the firing of other neurons. Most neurons that receive so much information excite other neurons; Purkinje cells inhibit. We don’t know why this is the case.

      THE CEREBELLUM AND THE SENSORY SYSTEM

      The Cerebellum receives information form the sensory systems—the somatic sensory system as well as the other major senses—

      How important is sensory information when it comes to movement.
      Movements are adapted to the goals at hand; movements are purposeful. To make movements effective, they are fine-tuned to the environment. For this to happen we need the help of the sensory systems. When we reach for a water bottle, we need to see where it is, precisely. When we step, we need to make sure where the ground is. This occurs because the sensory systems communicate with the motor systems. The cerebellum receives a lot of sensory information, but its job is not just a passive receiver. It needs to figure out what aspects of sensation are important for controlling movements.

      COMPLEX MOVEMENT VS SIMPLE MOVEMENT http://www.budovideos.com/shop/customer/product.php?productid=21392&cat=440&page=1.
      My movements are based on biomechanics which have shown to have a higher brain activity and a better connectivity between brain areas besides of increasing muscular performance and metabolic demand, take a look of this article http://www.ideafit.com/fitness-library/total-bodyexercises-1

      CEREBELLUM TESTING
      Now do you want to test your cerebellum? Stand up tall, raise left leg bent up in the air, close both eyes and clap for thirty times, your supporting foot should not be moving at all, isn’t challenging? Well the cerebellum it is not receiving the sensory proprioceptor of your eyes so you are challenging to the other sensory proprioceptors to be working together especially your propprioceptors in ligaments, tendons and muscles with other main muscle groups.

      BRAIN ACTIVITY AND TIME
      In theory do you think that 10 minutes of specific brain exercises a day is a good start? Would synapses strengthen if we were consistent?
      Time is a hard question to answer. Consistent neural processing of new information over 10 minutes is certainly enough to produce lasting changes in the properties of nerve cells. But this is mostly studied in animals, and in very specialized kinds of experiments. It is hard to extend this, in a quantitative way, to people performing movement tasks. Also, each person is different. Starting from scratch, in a person who has not exercised much, a short time is apt to be more effective than the same short time in someone who has a lot of exercise experience. This is as much as I can say.
      Yes, synapses strengthen when we are consistent. {{The also can strengthen when we are not, if the circumstances are particularly stressful or life threatening.}}

      LEARNING NEW COORDINATION PATTERNS
      Can learning new motor coordination patterns stimulate the cerebellum and create new synapses in theory?
      In theory, yes. The cerebellum is clearly important in learning new coordination patterns. But it is more than just the cerebellum. Many other parts of the motor systems respond to this challenge, especially the cerebral cortex motor centers and the areas of the nervous system that these cortical centers connect, such as the spinal cord.

      Why is important for human beings to learn new coordination patterns?
      I think it is just like continuously challenging the cognitive systems. It maintains the circuits for coordination/complex movements and builds new connections.

      Why it could be especially important for Alzheimer disease?
      Movements, and complex ones with novel coordination patterns in particular, recruit the entire brain. Not just the motor systems, but cognitive and memory systems as well. Maybe even the emotional systems, when we are pleasure or pain from our actions! For complex movements, we have to plan on the fly. It is very challenging. We need to tune into the proprioceptive capabilities of our sensory systems.

      Second, this area of the brain is very important for other functions as well, as you may know, so is there any evidence that in the case of damage or degeneration people will experience disorders in motor learning, posture and so on.
      Have you extended your studies to a group of people that have such disorders due to cerebellum damage?

      No, I believe that there is more research to be done but it is clear that combining strength training movements with new coordination and balance patters it could be a positive and reinforcing way to make anyone progress substantially. Having said this, it is extremely important that the program is specifically individualized to the client or patient needs.

      And my final one: Is there any research extended to Purkinje cells and neuronal plasticity done in conjunction with the exercises?? Prove of it should be quite remarkable.

      Science, Vol 206, Issue 4415, 230-232
      Copyright © 1979 by American Association for the Advancement of Science

      articles

      Exercise during development induces an increase in Purkinje cell dendrite tree size
      JJ Pysh and GM Weiss

      Mice allowed to exercise during the late postnatal period had Purkinje cells with larger dendritic trees and greater numbers of spines than littermates whose physical activity was severly restricted. These changes in Purkinje cells were accompanied by a selective reduction in the thickness of the cerebellar molecular layer. The data provide evidence for cerebellar plasticity during late development and demonstrate that physical activity can modify the development of Purkinje cell dendrites.

      J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 1992 Jan;12(1):110-9.
      Exercise and the brain: angiogenesis in the adult rat cerebellum after vigorous physical activity and motor skill learning.

      Isaacs KR, Anderson BJ, Alcantara AA, Black JE, Greenough WT.

      Beckman Institute, University of Illinois, Urbana.

      Erratum in:

      * J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 1992 May;12(3):533.

      The Journal of Neuroscience, April 15, 2000, 20(8):2926-2933
      Circulating Insulin-Like Growth Factor I Mediates Effects of Exercise on the Brain
      Eva Carro1, Angel Nuñez2, Svetlana Busiguina1, and Ignacio Torres-Aleman1

      1 Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology, Cajal Institute, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, 28002 Madrid, Spain, and 2 Department of Morphology, School of Medicine, Autonoma University, 28029 Madrid, Spain

      THE CEREBELLUM AND EXERCISE
      http://www.cornerstonechristiancounseling.org/html/exercise_your_brain.html

  3. August 4, 2010 10:00 pm

    I would like to exchange links with your site superbodysuperbrainblog.wordpress.com
    Is this possible?

  4. August 10, 2010 3:25 am

    Mr Gonzalez. This is first time I am visiting your blog. Very impressive. I will follow this blog.

    • August 10, 2010 10:05 am

      Thanks so much for your great comment!…..Greatly appreciated…made me really happy….a lot of work…! Thanks again

  5. August 30, 2010 8:27 am

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  6. September 20, 2010 9:00 am

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  7. December 1, 2010 2:37 am

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