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My first interview with Neurobiologist Jack Martin Ph.D, Expert in the motor system. Marrying Fitness with Neuroscience

February 4, 2011

fitness and neuroscience

fitness and neuroscience

Neuroscience and Fitness

THE MOTOR SYSTEM

Why is so important the motor system for the human being?

The motor systems of the brain and spinal cord control every movement we make, from the simplest to the most complex. Movements define us as humans every bit as much as our intellect, or our art. Movements have allowed us to excel over animals throughout evolution. Movement gives us mobility; to choose to go where and do what we want. Just as movements become hampered—such as weakness or paralysis after stroke or slowed by Parkinson’s disease—we loose something is important to us.

Are motor skills really important as well?

Yes. It is our skills that got us where were are today! Certainly not our brut strength. Like a sharp intellect confers great advantage, so too do well honed skills. In many professions, like athletes, dancers, or surgeons, the need for motor skill is obvious. Most of the time it is not so obvious, but nonetheless important. Think about it, when you are trying to fix a loose screw in a pair of eyeglasses or tying a bow, driving a car, peeling potatoes.

I also think that we take a certain measure of skill for granted that allows us to focus on other aspects of our live, which may not require as much motor skill. When each movement becomes a burden, it robs us of a broader spirit.

to see Jack Martin’s research papers click here

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